Nectarine & Raspberry Cobbler – Summertime Memories

by on August 30, 2010

Few desserts embody summertime for me more than chin-dripping, sweet nectarines combined with plump, slightly tart raspberries slowly baked together under a rustic country-style topping.  Cobblers, crumbles, pies, crisps laden with juicy summer fruit, may the gods help me from eating the whole thing in one sitting. Especially with a dollop of fresh whipped cream or ice cream served alongside.

The star ingredients: sweet,  fresh nectarines and raspberries

Over the years, I’ve become more aware of how precious seasonal foods can be, savoring fruits in the height of their season. Growing up in farming valley I was ignorantly lucky to have my palate imprinted with the flavors and textures of amazing fruit.  I had no idea how good those nectarines, cherries, and watermelon really were.  They were just consumed in the naive exuberance that defines youth. Thankfully, I’ve never forgotten.

Now, even as culinary skills have been honed and palates become well-traveled, it is often the rustic country-style desserts which come to mind when making a sweet pleasure out of perfect summertime fruit. It rekindles the scents, feel, and love of summertime from childhood.  Days upon days of exploring the land throughout our ranch.  Carefully lifting rocks in the creek hoping to find a crawdad or traipsing up and down the creek’s length on our property discovering the best fishing holes.  Saddling up Sandy, or Frosty, or Jamboree (whoever was my horse at the time) and riding up in the hills, grasshoppers exploding from the grasses at every step.

Left: before the bake with the raw dough and right: after the bake.

We didn’t even have cobblers very often growing up.  More often, it was popsicles or ice cream.  Maybe a cake made for a potluck or birthday.  But as my memories expand and mingle, the best of all the roads I’ve traveled over the years begin merge in my heart. Through my mind flash indescribable and precious little moments like a great wedding slideshow capturing the joy and love of a special moment.

There is such a simple beauty to all of those cobblers and kin of summertime. They are easy and quick to make.  The fruit is amazing. And the memories are the gentle euphoria of life.

You know, now after reminiscing, maybe I see why I want to eat the whole cobbler in one sitting.

-Todd

Nectarine cobbler hot out of the oven! And we made something special with  extra cobbler dough. Next week’s post!

Nectarine (or Peach) &  Raspberry Cobbler Recipe

Yield: 1 10" cobbler

Total Time: 50 minutes

You easily substitute peaches or blackberries in this recipe and it will still be utterly divine.  Since nectarines cling to their seeds, it is easier to cut all the slices while the nectarines are whole (if you are comfortable holding the nectarine up in one hand and slicing it with the other) then peeling the small individual slices off of the seed.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs (910g) ripe Nectarines, sliced in 1/4" wedges-skin on
  • cinnamon sugar to taste (1 part cinnamon, 3 parts sugar)
  • 1/2 lb (225g) fresh Raspberries

    Cobbler Topping

  • 1 c (160g) all-purpose Flour
  • pinch of Sea Salt
  • 2 t (10g) Baking Powder
  • 2 T (30g) cold unsalted Butter, cut in small chunks
  • just over 3/4 c (195ml)  Heavy Cream

Directions:

    Preheat oven to 400° F

  1. Put nectarine wedges in a bowl and gently toss with cinnamon sugar.  Add raspberries and gently pack into a baking dish.
  2. Sift together flour, sea salt, and baking powder in a med. bowl.  Add butter and pinch butter with flour until it is the size of small peas.  Pour in heavy cream and mix to form a soft dough (be careful not to over-mix).
  3. Pinch the dough into small flattened chunks and place in random or artistic piles (should look rustic) on top of nectarines, leaving a little room around the edges for the juices to bubble and allow the peaches to peak through. Sprinkle a little cinnamon sugar on top.
  4. Place in oven and bake for approx. 30-40 min or until top is golden.  Set aside for at least 30 min. before serving to allow to cool and for juices to absorb into crust. Serve with ice cream or fresh whipped cream.
Recipe Source: WhiteOnRiceCouple.com.

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{ 42 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Jessica @ How Sweet August 30, 2010 at 3:44 am

We rarely had cobblers growing up too – it was more ice cream or something of the sort. But now I love making cobblers for dessert. They look beautiful!

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2 alison August 30, 2010 at 5:15 am

This looks fabulous! Can’t wait to meet y’all in a few weeks!

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3 Kim @ Two Good Cookies August 30, 2010 at 7:25 am

They don’t really “do” cobblers in England. I can’t wait to introduce them to this baby. It’s a revolution. I can feel it.

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4 Maria August 30, 2010 at 7:51 am

Warm cobbler topped with ice cream reminds me of summer. My dad made blackberry cobbler every year, we couldn’t get enough. I just made a plum peach cobbler, I will have to try this version next. Love the dishes too!

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5 Prerna August 30, 2010 at 8:09 am

Oh my lord! How do you do this? Everything looks so perfect and dreamy :-)

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6 TheKitchenWitch August 30, 2010 at 8:20 am

I’m totally loving the ooze over the sides of the dishes! Heaven!

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7 Chris @ larkcrafts.com August 30, 2010 at 8:21 am

Cobblers were THE dessert of summer growing up. There were two completely different cobbler methods my mom, aunts, and the church ladies lined up behind. One was this wonderful method, a pie dough (sweetened or plain), crumbled on top of fruit. The other was a batter formulae that starts with melting a stick of butter in the bottom of a 9 x 13 pyrex dish, then adding (but not blending with the butter) a pancake-like batter of flour, sugar, leavening, salt, spices, and milk. The fruit, briefly macerated with a little sugar, scatters on top. In the oven, like magic, some batter rises to top to make brown and crispy lumps between the fruit. In our house, Skip (the crust-making wizard) makes the dough method, I make the batter.

I WANT THOSE RAMEKINS! They are gorgeous.

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8 Jenny Flake August 30, 2010 at 8:49 am

Gorgeous recipe, gorgeous photos! Love checking in to see what y’all are cookin’! have a great Monday!

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9 Louise Mellor August 30, 2010 at 8:55 am

Love the blue ramekins. Cobbler is to summer what bread pudding is to the fall- comforting
~Chef Louise

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10 Shaheen {The Purple Foodie} August 30, 2010 at 9:16 am

LOVE when the juices of the berries drip from the ramekin when they’re baking. I’m so inspired by your photography, and always make it a point to read your posts of foodblogforum.

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11 amy August 30, 2010 at 9:53 am

i gotta agree with the above comments on those gorgeous blue ramekins. cobblers. another one of the something something that i have not made! nectarine raspberry sounds yumm. love the sweet but tart-ish:)

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12 The Italian Dish August 30, 2010 at 9:54 am

So beautiful – as usual. Can’t wait to see what you’re making with the extra dough!

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13 Cookin' Canuck August 30, 2010 at 10:24 am

Wonderful memories of your childhood. This cobbler just screams “summer”. Where did you find those unusual blue ramekins?

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14 Patricia Scarpin August 30, 2010 at 10:40 am

Such a delicious combo of flavors – beautiful!

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15 Jessica August 30, 2010 at 11:56 am

Delicious! I enjoy a delicious cobbler and crisp more than even pie. I love the way the juice is running down the sides of your dish. Yum!

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16 Bret Bannon August 30, 2010 at 1:15 pm

What a great website. I found you via David Lebovitz and I’m sure glad I did. Thanks for all the great photography information.

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17 joudie's Mood Food August 30, 2010 at 3:10 pm

We have something like this in the uk called crumble. But i think this is far more superior. It just looks SO MUCH BETTER and i am sure having those little dough balls is just amazing soaking up all the flavours! How gorgeous!

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18 Lydia (The Perfect Pantry) August 30, 2010 at 5:12 pm

Cobblers (pronounced cobblahs around here) are a very typical New England dessert. With nectarines and peaches finally available from local orchards, it’s time to make cobblers, crisps and buckles.

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19 Angharad August 31, 2010 at 10:45 am

I never ate cobbler growing up but crumble was a popular choice…it’s basically a British version of a crisp and therefore related to this beauty.
These look absolutely adorable in their little blue pots. I love em. Cooking with seasonal fruit is becoming one of my favourite things as well, simply because you really can taste that sweet sweet difference!

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20 colleen August 31, 2010 at 2:14 pm

Oh, I LOVE raspberries and with either (quality) peaches or nectarines…Whoa, what a treat!
I savor just the thought of this combination. I have memories of these treat combos, but maybe not in a cobbler. How delicious!!!

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21 Winnie August 31, 2010 at 6:16 pm

Beautiful writing and exquisite looking cobbler!

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22 Laura August 31, 2010 at 8:30 pm

I have had cobblers and crisps my whole life, usually something that was growing in a tree (peaches) or a prickly vine (blackberries) out back somewhere. Never raspberries though. I didn’t appreciate it then but I sure wish I had that going on now. Now we just go with what is at the farmers market which is truly quite fun and delicious and seasonal.

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23 delicieux August 31, 2010 at 8:34 pm

Mmmm this looks so delicious (both the cobbler and the photos). I can’t wait for nectarines to come into season here.

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24 Lucy August 31, 2010 at 11:39 pm

I want those blue dishes with the cobbler still piping hot from the oven! What’s the difference between crumble and streusel and crisp?

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25 White on Rice Couple September 1, 2010 at 5:46 pm

Basically the toppings and the amount of “cake” part vary a bit. For the most part they are all similar in concept just variances on the details and all delicious! This site had a good breakdown on the differences.

The blue ramekins were a Marshals find, but we’ve seen the same (for more $$) at Sur La Table.

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26 Adam September 1, 2010 at 12:14 pm

This looks stellar,. We did something similar in the Lick My Spoon offices about a month ago (http://bit.ly/b8WqCi).

I think I have the same question as everyone else: where did those ramekins come from?

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27 Jennifer(Savor) September 1, 2010 at 3:46 pm

Beautiful memories, photos and recipe

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28 leon koh September 2, 2010 at 1:12 am

i have been a reader of your blog and love your pictures of yummy food..

I have a good friend who is a good chef cooking up awesome thai dishes..he just started his blog at
http://baimohn.blogspot.com/

Hope you can give him your support

Leon Singapore :)

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29 Katie @ goodLife {eats} September 2, 2010 at 6:43 am

I love cobbler! I made a peach, raspberry, and blueberry cobbler this summer that was so good I only got 1 serving and Eric got 3! Can’t wait to see what you made with the extra dough. :)

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30 Elizabeth September 2, 2010 at 8:48 am

Yum! I had nothing BUT cobblers growing up…or crisps or crumbles. My mother was not a “baker” per se, but enjoyed making a quick dessert after dinner. It was always apple or blackberry, an abundance of which we had growing in the backyard.

Whenever I make one or see one now it does remind me of my childhood, spooning still warm, drippy fruit covered in ice cream or whipped cream into my mouth. Yum! Thanks for the memories!

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31 the urban baker September 2, 2010 at 8:55 am

what lovely, lovely photos. you are an inspiration!

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32 Cynthia September 2, 2010 at 1:24 pm

There are so many things to like about this post – from the memory, to the ramekins to the photography.

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33 marla {family fresh cooking} September 3, 2010 at 4:43 am

These cobblers are beautiful. Such a simple rustic dessert that brings memories flooding back to most. These robin’s egg blue tiny casserole pots are extra gorgeous complimented by the warm colors of the fruit & crust. Can’t wait to see what you cook up next with that extra dough! Thanks for sharing such nice memories with us.

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34 Sophia September 7, 2010 at 10:44 am

Wow, great job here. Awesome picture too! You should really consider submitting this to Recipe4Living’s Fall Cobbler Recipe Contest – http://www.recipe4living.com/articles/the_fall_cobbler_recipe_contest.htm – It looks delicious!

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35 kwpang September 9, 2010 at 1:09 am

It look really simple to make and very nice to eat too, hope you don’t mind cos i just copied the recipe down and plan to make it one day.

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36 balanced scorecard September 25, 2010 at 8:47 am

Delightful pictures and awesome recipe. I can imagine the flavor of the cobbler, it is delicious!

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37 Marisa September 28, 2010 at 5:10 am

Am also a relatively new convert to cobblers – don’t think my mom ever made them – but I just love their versatility. And what better way to showcase the sweet in-season fruit?

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38 Dinetonite December 2, 2010 at 6:54 am

I love peaches!!!!!!!

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39 Hayley May 1, 2011 at 8:54 am

Hi there,

I know this may sound like a silly question, but do I have to serve/prepare this in separate ramekins like you did? Or can I put the entire mixture into a 9×13 pan and spoon out servings?

Please let me know as this looks fantastic!

Thanks!

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40 White on Rice Couple May 1, 2011 at 11:57 am

Hi Hayley,
You can easily make this in a bigger pan. You might have to increase baking time a bit, but it should work perfectly fine. We just did it in the ramekins for cuteness and individual portion servings.

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41 Hayley May 7, 2011 at 9:27 am

Thanks so much! Do you know how much longer to bake for or just wait til the top is golden brown?

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42 White on Rice Couple May 7, 2011 at 10:12 am

I’d have to test to give you a decent estimate of time, but the best way is to just bake until the top is golden. Good luck!

Todd

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