Fig Bruschetta Recipe and Love of Fig Photographs

Fig and Ricotta Bruschetta Recipe White On Rice Couple I vividly remember a conversation I had with a fellow food photographer/food blogger a few years ago about figs. Food talk with fellow food bloggers? I didn’t intend for this an “f” alliteration, but doesn’t it sound like it could be the title of a food column? Yes? Anyways, I’ll get back on track about all this fig talk. I have a tendency to get off track at times and figuring all this out during the blog post will give you a better idea of how my crazy mind works.

Anyways, fig talk, yes, figs. Around this time of year, our figs are dripping with fruit and I was telling this person how I love figs and how much I love photographing figs. Figs are sexy, beautiful and I just can’t get enough of photographing and seeing them in images.

Fig and Ricotta Bruschetta Recipe White On Rice Couple

This food blogger responded by telling me that fig pictures are over-rated (or something to that point) and said that everyone always has a default fig picture to show off. This person was tired of seeing figs pictures. And this person was tired of seeing egg pictures in baskets, ribbons around cookies and a few other examples of popular food styling that I was clearly “guilty” of.

It took me a few moments to think about how to respond. All my mind could whisper was “…but…but…i love fig pictures. and I have a whole Lightroom folder of ribbon-ed cookies and basket-ed eggs!”.

I quickly realized that no matter what anyone’s opinions are about what other people are doing online, I respect their choice and I clearly have the option to read their content or not. So rather than sit and make fun of other people and what they are doing, why don’t we just surround ourselves with content that we love. Why waste time looking/reading/following others and their content that we don’t like or agree with? Oy, such silly questions have easy answers.

So in the spirit of always being true to yourself and doing what you love and not being hurt by outside criticism (cliche ideas, maybe?), I’m here to tell you that I FREAKING LOVE FIG PICTURES (dammit) and I will continue to share them whether or not some people make fun of them.

And so here you have it, a crap load of fig pictures to look at and a really good fig bruschetta recipe that goes along with it!

So to all you fig picture haters, take that.

Nothing but love and #TeamFig ,

diane

luscious, sexy figs

Fig and Ricotta Bruschetta Recipe White On Rice Couple

Joy of figs here

Fig and Ricotta Bruschetta Recipe White On Rice Couple

#TeamFig

Fig and Ricotta Bruschetta Recipe White On Rice Couple

 More Fig Recipes:

Roasted Figs with Sage and Wine Recipe
Fig Pecan Sticky Buns Recipe
Rosted Fig and Goat Cheese Ice Cream Recipe
Fig Focaccia Recipe
Marinated Fig Salad Recipe

Fig Bruschetta Recipe

Yield: Serves 3-4

Total Time: 45 min

The addition of the fig compote on the bruschetta adds another layer of wonderful fig flavor and texture. But if you don't have time to make the fig compote, plenty of fresh, sweet figs on top will be equally delicious.

Ingredients:

For the Roasted Fig Puree Recipe:

  • 1/2 pound (225g) ripe figs
  • 2 Tablespoons (30ml) balsamic vinegar, divided
  • 1 Tablespoon (15g) brown sugar

For the Fig Bruschetta assembly:

  • Crusty bread loaf or baguette, sliced thin or grilled (optional)
  • Olive Oil for brushing the bread, if you are serving it grilled
  • 5-6 ripe figs, quartered
  • 1 cup Ricotta Cheese
  • 1/4 cup chopped pecans
  • Fresh thyme leaves

Directions:

Roasted Fig Puree Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.
  2. Slice the tough stems off of the figs then slice the figs into quarters. Place the figs in a baking dish and toss with one Tablespoon of balsamic vinegar and brown sugar. Cover the baking dish with foil and roast for 15-20 minutes or until the figs are soft.
  3. When cool enough to handle, puree the figs in a food processor or blender with the remaining tablespoon of balsamic vinegar (feel free to add more balsamic to taste). Put puree in a bowl and place in fridge to cool until ready to use

Bruschetta Directions

  1. If you are grilling the bread: heat the grill and lightly brush each sides of sliced bread with olive oil. Grill each side of the bread till crisp.
  2. Spread ricotta cheese over each slice of bread.
  3. Top each bread slice with fig puree, pecans, fresh figs and fresh thyme leaves.
  4. Serve on a platter or wood cutting board as the perfect appetizer.
Recipe Source: WhiteOnRiceCouple.com.

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